Living & Working in Poland

Are you looking forward to settling down in Poland?

Poland is a vibrant and exciting country. Living in Poland has not always been a picnic. Today, however, life in Poland is very pleasant, with people who are nothing but sociable and welcoming.

Culture and People

The majority of all people living in Poland (about 60%) have settled in the country's urban areas. There are quite a few bigger towns in Poland, with life in Poland focusing on five of them, which qualify as major cities. Warsaw, the country's capital, alone has about 1.7 million inhabitants. Most inhabitants are of a Polish descent. In fact, there is only a small minority of Germans, Ukrainians, Slovaks, Lithuanians, and Belarusians.

The country's many traditions and local customs emerged from Latin and Byzantine influences and were strongly shaped by various European occupiers. As mentioned above, life in Poland is mainly influenced by the geniality of the Polish people. The culture is a rather welcoming one. Even if you do not speak the language fluently yet, you will probably be quickly included and find new friends in Poland. attempt to convince a Pole you have visited their country.

Residence Card

Every foreign student needs to have a Residence Card to stay in Poland.

Students from the EU needs Residence Card to legalise their stay after the first three formality-free months.

Non-EU students should apply for a Residence Card before their visa expires in one year.

A Residence Card is an ID card that proves that you have a residence permit. Together with your travel document it allows you to cross the Polish border as many times as you wish. It is issued for the period of your studies. You are allowed to travel through all the Schengen member countries as well as work in Poland if you have a Residence card.

REMEMBER: You should apply for the Residence Card when you are legally staying in Poland, which means after you arrive, but before the end of the three month period (EU students) or the expiration of your visa (non-EU students).

Visa & Travel

Entry Requirements For Eu Citizens

If you are a citizen of an EU member state the only thing you need to have to enter Poland is a valid travel document or a document confirming identity and citizenship (i.e. your national ID). However, if you wish to travel abroad during your stay in Poland it is a good idea to have a passport with you, as it is necessary to visit some of Poland's neighbours that don't belong to the EU.

For a stay shorter than three months there are no formal requirements. Your studies will however take longer. For such a stay a registration of residence is necessary. You should register with Voivodship (Provincial) Office and get a Temporary Residence Card for maximum period of two years.

Entry Requirements For Non-EU Citizens

The two main documents you will to enter Poland if are not a EU citizen are a valid travel document (passport) and a visa (if required). As a general rule Non-EU citizens need a visa to enter Poland. As the country is part of the Schengen zone, you can apply for visa and travel all around Europe! There are several types of visas to choose from.CHENGEN C TYPE VISA

"C" type - a short-term Schengen visa allowing the holder to stay in the Schengen territory for up to 90 days in a six months period.

The Schengen visa is good for business visits, tourism, short private visits, participation in conferences, cultural and sports events. It can be issued either as single, double or multiple entry visa depending on the purpose of the trip. Examples of the purpose of the trip: Education, business, tourism, visiting family and friends, political, scientific, cultural, sports or religious events, studies, employment, other.

"D" type - a long-term national visa issued for up to one year allowing travel around the Schengen area for three months in a half a year period.

The Polish national visa is usually good for those travelling to undertake studies and employment and also those who want to spend more than three months with their families and friends.RANSIT AIRPORT VISA

"A" type - an airport transit Schengen visa, so it cannot be used by a student coming to Poland.

Working In Poland

You can help pay for your education by working part-time while you're studying.

International students have the right to work while studying in Poland as long as they are enrolled in an Institution. Students who are not nationals of EU member countries must also hold a valid residency permit. The right to work applies to all students, including those who are in Poland for the first time, those who are enrolled in the first year of a university program, and those who are enrolled full-time in a language school.

20hrs work permitted during studies as well as 3 months of full time work during holidays. Full time work is permitted for Residence Card holders.

Students from member countries of the European Union may work in Poland without restriction after they graduate. It may be really hard to leave such a beautiful country after you complete your education here. Don't worry if you prefer to stay and work in Poland. As a graduate of a Polish higher education institution full-time program, you don't need a permit to work here. Just make sure your stay permit is in order. You can stay back for further 2-3 years as long as you can prove that you can financially support yourself without seeking any government benefits. Students who obtain a job or accept employment can obtain a Work Permit.

Blue Card

All kind of professionals can apply for a Blue card once they find an employer. This is valid initially for 2years and than extended for further 3 years and the person can work all over European Union in the Blue card scheme participating countries After 5 years you can apply for Permanent Residence option.

For more information please email info@apexedu.in or submit your query online.